OPTOMETRY NEWS

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New Screen Glasses for Blue light

Ace & Tate, UK, has introduced new Screen Glasses to protect the public’s eyes from the effects of blue light emitted from digital screens.

These glasses, alleged to block 94% of short-wavelength blue light, are available with non-prescription lenses that are made with a Blue Light Filter to increase eye comfort.

However, customers who need a prescription can add the Blue Light Filter to their regular glasses for a nominal charge.

“Screen Glasses act as sister to our Blue Light Filter. It’s the perfect solution for everyone who wants to protect their eyes from blue rays but doesn’t need prescription frames. This new addition to the family eliminates glare and its big benefit is that it increases comfort for people who look at digital screens a lot — all of us, basically,” says a company spokesperson.

New vision test for tiny tots

Researchers from the University of Waterloo have devised a new test to help detect vision impairment in very young children – this will enable them to get sight-saving treatment as soon as possible.

The tests currently available are dependent on a child’s ability to identify letters or match shapes, which makes it difficult to accurately identify vision loss in children under the age of three.

“Tests are available which rely on the direction of a baby’s gaze to determine whether or not they can see a particular visual stimulus; however, these ‘preferential looking’ tests use specially calibrated printed images that are expensive to produce. These tests are also not as good at detecting vision disorders as those that ask older children to match shapes,” said Dr Susan Leat, a professor at the School of Optometry & Vision Science and lead author of the study.

The new test involves using a computer display with a variety of shapes. However, instead of requiring children to match a shape, they will be asked to point to a specific shape. When they choose correctly, an animation will play.

“Our earlier research with adults showed that this method of measuring visual acuity gives the same results as when you ask the person to read the letters on the letter chart aloud,” said Dr Leat.

In addition to being an effective measure of visual acuity, the new test offers other benefits as well. As it uses simple shapes, not letters, it can be used in any country and printed versions will be easier and more economical to print than the more complex preferential looking tests.

The project has been awarded a $171,300 grant from Fighting Blindness Canada (FBC), the country’s largest private charitable funder of vision research.

Vision rehab treatment effective for TBI patients

An international study titled “Efficacy and predictors of Recovery of Function After Eye Movement Training in 296 Hemianopic Patients,” shows that visual rehabilitation can be effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). As per the journal Cortex in which the study is published, this is the largest neuro-visual study of its kind.

The research team discovered that the NeuroEyeCoach visual rehabilitation therapy applied after stroke or other traumatic brain injury improved vision in over 80 percent of patients, helping them to cope with day-to-day tasks and making their quality of life better.

“Up to recently, there was very little treatment available to restore vision loss in this population,” said Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and co-author of the study.

The study conducted on around 300 patients in Europe, involving U.S. and European patients, showed that maximum improvement was seen in patients within 2-3 weeks of therapy. 87 percent of the patients improved in search time and 80 percent had made fewer errors leading to reduced disability.

The use of NeuroEyeCoach in the study is an important aspect as there was a noticeable improvement in eye movements and it enabled patients to interact with the environment more smoothly. The study team also noted that there was a reduction in errors following the therapy and patients could see things much faster. In their self-assessment, patients stated that the therapy improves their activities of daily living, such as exploring their surroundings better, identifying obstacles and avoiding collisions.

Additionally, the improvements were not dependent on age, gender, side of blindness, nor the time elapsed since the brain injury. The study also found that there was no upper age limit to the success of the treatment. This is the first time that a treatment of this kind has been shown to be effective in both old as well as young adults.

New Screen Glasses for Blue light​

New Screen Glasses for Blue light

Ace & Tate, UK, has introduced new Screen Glasses to protect the public’s eyes from the effects of blue light emitted from digital screens.

These glasses, alleged to block 94% of short-wavelength blue light, are available with non-prescription lenses that are made with a Blue Light Filter to increase eye comfort.

However, customers who need a prescription can add the Blue Light Filter to their regular glasses for a nominal charge.

“Screen Glasses act as sister to our Blue Light Filter. It’s the perfect solution for everyone who wants to protect their eyes from blue rays but doesn’t need prescription frames. This new addition to the family eliminates glare and its big benefit is that it increases comfort for people who look at digital screens a lot — all of us, basically,” says a company spokesperson.

New vision test for tiny tots​

New vision test for tiny tots

Researchers from the University of Waterloo have devised a new test to help detect vision impairment in very young children – this will enable them to get sight-saving treatment as soon as possible.

The tests currently available are dependent on a child’s ability to identify letters or match shapes, which makes it difficult to accurately identify vision loss in children under the age of three.

“Tests are available which rely on the direction of a baby’s gaze to determine whether or not they can see a particular visual stimulus; however, these ‘preferential looking’ tests use specially calibrated printed images that are expensive to produce. These tests are also not as good at detecting vision disorders as those that ask older children to match shapes,” said Dr Susan Leat, a professor at the School of Optometry & Vision Science and lead author of the study.

The new test involves using a computer display with a variety of shapes. However, instead of requiring children to match a shape, they will be asked to point to a specific shape. When they choose correctly, an animation will play.

“Our earlier research with adults showed that this method of measuring visual acuity gives the same results as when you ask the person to read the letters on the letter chart aloud,” said Dr Leat.

In addition to being an effective measure of visual acuity, the new test offers other benefits as well. As it uses simple shapes, not letters, it can be used in any country and printed versions will be easier and more economical to print than the more complex preferential looking tests.

The project has been awarded a $171,300 grant from Fighting Blindness Canada (FBC), the country’s largest private charitable funder of vision research.

Vision rehab treatment effective for TBI patients

Vision rehab treatment effective for TBI patients

An international study titled “Efficacy and predictors of Recovery of Function After Eye Movement Training in 296 Hemianopic Patients,” shows that visual rehabilitation can be effective for patients who have suffered vision loss related to stroke or traumatic brain injury (TBI). As per the journal Cortex in which the study is published, this is the largest neuro-visual study of its kind.

The research team discovered that the NeuroEyeCoach visual rehabilitation therapy applied after stroke or other traumatic brain injury improved vision in over 80 percent of patients, helping them to cope with day-to-day tasks and making their quality of life better.

“Up to recently, there was very little treatment available to restore vision loss in this population,” said Jose Romano, Chief of the Stroke Division at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and co-author of the study.

The study conducted on around 300 patients in Europe, involving U.S. and European patients, showed that maximum improvement was seen in patients within 2-3 weeks of therapy. 87 percent of the patients improved in search time and 80 percent had made fewer errors leading to reduced disability.

The use of NeuroEyeCoach in the study is an important aspect as there was a noticeable improvement in eye movements and it enabled patients to interact with the environment more smoothly. The study team also noted that there was a reduction in errors following the therapy and patients could see things much faster. In their self-assessment, patients stated that the therapy improves their activities of daily living, such as exploring their surroundings better, identifying obstacles and avoiding collisions.

Additionally, the improvements were not dependent on age, gender, side of blindness, nor the time elapsed since the brain injury. The study also found that there was no upper age limit to the success of the treatment. This is the first time that a treatment of this kind has been shown to be effective in both old as well as young adults.

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